Menu

Falling Apart Necklace

< back to previous page

Only 1 available. ~ Hover to zoom ~

White jade rectangles and pink sapphires set in 14 KT yellow gold.

Falling Apart Necklaces came about due to Jane Magon reconsidering the traditional CONSTRUCTION of necklaces:  the notion that necklaces are always ‘put together,’ in order to be worn.

The necklace that is meant to appear to fall apart is still somewhat connected (in order to wear it).   However, it looks as if it is falling apart.  Jane has ‘tipped’ and juggled the slices of jade at indiscriminate angles to ‘deconstruct’ the traditional ‘order’ of a standard necklace.  Is it constructed – or deconstructed?

The jade and pink sapphires are bezel set in 14 carat yellow gold. The clasp is disguised as part of the necklace of ‘pieces’.

 

Each Jane Magon piece is hand crafted and unique.

Item code: F-A 2 (A)

Price on Application

Falling Apart Necklaces came about as I reconsidered the traditional CONSTRUCTION of necklaces: the notion that necklaces are always ‘put together,’ in order to be worn.

Deconstruction puts authority out of joint – as in the necklace I have tipped and juggled the slices of jade, white agate or stone at indiscriminate angles to ‘deconstruct’ the traditional ‘order’ of a standard necklace (where stones and settings behave themselves – fitting into a pre-ordained order). Falling Apart Necklaces are forever in a state of suspension – neither made – nor completely falling apart. There is no clear resolution.

This style of necklace is playing with the concept of the necklace falling apart and the notion of DECONSTRUCTION – meaning ‘to pull apart’ (and yet it can still be worn). However it is forever suspended in an imperfect situation (which I find amusing) and of interest. Criticism seeks to support the authorized meaning of a text (necklace), the author’s original meaning yet for Derrida, deconstruction consists in displacing this ‘order’ & is the enemy of an authoritarian text (construct) – such as the one any author/ designer/artist makes (including mine).

Norris considers that the ‘tension between what the text (the necklace in this case), means to say and what it is … constrained to mean’ (Norris 1987, 19). So that the necklace that is meant to fall apart is still somewhat connected (in order to wear it).

However, it looks as if it is falling apart which makes ‘present the permanently elusive’ (Payne, 1993, p. 21). When in a ‘taken for granted power hierarchy’ (a necklace that is ordered), is subsequently reversed, and creates disorder – and finally pulls it apart, it looks as if it is falling apart – yet it is not.

Deconstruction might suggest that the opposite is always apparent in every ‘thesis.’ Here the ‘opposite’ is apparent within this genre of necklace: Falling Apart, which (by reversing the hierarchy such as traditionally ‘ordered’ stones placed in a logical order) is a version of exposing binary opposites (of order and disorder). In this case the necklace is simultaneously suspended between a state of construction and deconstruction.

Falling Apart Necklace is connected to the idea of ‘play’ in philosophy and creativity: for out of those practices something different arises. Philosophy also entertains the idea of the Creation-Destruction cycle (where creation follows destruction). This genre of necklace operates within these above parameters.

Rolf, Gary.       (2004) “Deconstruction in a Nutshell”, Blackwell Publishing, Nursing Philosophy 5, (pp.274-276)
Norris, C.         (1987) Derrida, Fontana, London.
Norris, C.         (1991) Deconstruction: Theory and Practice, Routledge, London. p.19)
Payne, M.       (1993)  Reading Theory, Blackwell, Oxford. p. 21)

  • 9 x rectangular slabs of white jade (35 x 25mm)
  • 10 x pink sapphires (from 5.45 x 5.15mm)
  • in 14 KT yellow gold
  • Jade box clasp